Archive | November, 2013

Social Media 101

28 Nov

Here I am going to simplify the process by which a social media campaign can & will enhance your marketing.

This is crucial for small businesses who are struggling at the moment as the majority of social media platforms are free to use (at the moment).

However – like most “free” activities, you really do need to use it correctly for it to work.

The first step is to work out what your goals are!

Most small businesses will want at least one of the following (some will want all of them),

  1. General marketing (getting your name out there).
  2. Interaction with the customer / potential customer base
  3. Sharing of idea’s / offers / competitions
  4. Showcase new products
  5. Drive traffic to your website

The next step is to identify platforms 

There’s no point in jumping into all & then feeling deflated when they dont work!

  1. Twitter – My favourite!  Connection with customers in short sharp bites of info.
  2. Facebook – 70% of users are small businesses / owners
  3. Pinterest – Create showcasing boards of products / merchandise & share out
  4. Blog – Lots of info, Gives a “personal feel” for customers.
  5. Linked-In – Very professional, Perfect for sourcing info on clients / colleagues
  6. Google + – after a shaky start, this is coming into its own – Just think, Google LOVES Google +
  7. Lots more – all of which need to be researched.

Now work out which ones are right for your business

  1. Do you offer a service that needs explaining?
  2. Do you offer products which change rapidly?
  3. Are your product lines static?
  4. Which demographic are you aimed at? Professional, Manual, Skilled, age related?
  5. Can you link from your website (some sites are not #Pinterest or #Instagram friendly)
  6. Are you able to identify the sites your competitors use?

Plan Plan Plan

  1. When should you post?
  2. Will your customers appreciate automated posts or will it turn them off?
  3. What time are your demographic on-line
  4. Are your services / products seasonal?
  5. What links are relevant to which of your target audience?

Now comes the hard work

  1. Make sure you monitor your presence
  2. Respond to direct messages/questions personally (not automated)
  3. Be proactive when trying to increase followers / likes etc – Research on this is vital
  4. Keep an eye on competitors
  5. Welcome all feedback, good or bad! Respond professionally & with solutions
  6. Actively engage your customers, welcome them into your “family” (business)
  7. Monitor search terms that are relevant & actively incorporate these into your plan.
  8. Join relevant groups / networks on-line.

Now if all of the above seems like a lot of work for something that is essentially a “free” tool, that’s because it is hard work…

The presence you develop on Social media will be there forever, you need to ensure it shows your passion for your business as well as your regard for your clients/customers. This needs to run hand in hand with informative & relevant content.

Your prospective client needs to feel that their very precious time is best placed with you.

Should you do this yourself?

Of course you can BUT do you have the time to do it properly?

Anything less than full attention to a social media campaign can leave you despondent & feeling let down. This is why you as a small business should invest in a social media manager or a consultant. This can cost as little as £1 a day.

Please read my other blogs on the subjects above for some more tips & hints.

I hope the above helps.

Karin

Please join Rocoja on any of the social media platforms below

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Or contact us via

info@Rocoja.co.uk

Gathering Intel

14 Nov

Part of the services I offer is the “Build a Database” service.

This includes capturing details of followers/friends (where possible) on FB / Twitter & placing these details in a basic format

(more commonly excel). This can be from scratch or from an existing list of followers.

This usually doesn’t cause much of an issue as I (or one of my colleagues) am the one compiling the list from scratch & 99% of the time this is done electronically (straight onto excel).

However I have recently come across a number of small businesses which are run from home offices etc, where the owner / director is still keeping manual records. This is something I happily transfer to electronic however I have been astounded at the level of sensitive information people have lying about in their home-offices.

I’ve seen folders full of names & addresses; customers scribbled down in haste and with information so sensitive its astounding.

Collecting customer information is VITAL for small business, a basic database is essential for mail-shots/loyalty schemes and information such as this used correctly can breed customer loyalty & promote sales.

However you must never forget your responsibilty to keep this information secure.

If you handle personal information about individuals, you have a number of legal obligations to protect that information under the Data Protection Act 1998.

see :- Data Protection

Please email me with any request for quotes on how to transfer your paper files to a basic database easily if you are in SWLondon or Surrey.

Karin@Rocoja.co.uk

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a Small Business supporting fellow small businesses.

Oh & PS – Try to make the writing easy to decipher – Pretty please

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